Former train station renovated, now offers a unique dining experience

Maach Ecute

 

Manseibashi Station (万世橋駅 Manseibashi-eki) can refer to two closed railway stations all in Chiyoda, Tokyo, Japan. One was a railway station on the Japanese Government Railways Chūō Main Line and the other was a subway station in the Tokyo Subway network.

Both stations were closed by 1943, though trains and subway cars still pass through them. The stations took their name from the nearby bridge, Manseibashi. The railway station was located on the south bank of the Kanda River, while the subway station was located on the north bank. The area north of the bridge is known as “Akihabara Electric Town”. Some train enthusiasts have dubbed Manseibashi station “the phantom station”.

 

Redevelopment

Saturday, September 14, 2013, sees the opening of Maach Ecute Kanda Manseibashi, a commercial facility with 11 outlets including restaurants, cafés, and retailers. Its home is the red brick Manseibashi viaduct, located between Ochanomizu and Kanda stations on the JR Chuo Line, and stretching along the Kanda-gawa River from the Manseibashi area to Sotobori-dori Street. The complex pays tribute to its history as the former Manseibashi Station and later the Transportation Museum. For instance, two sets of stairs will open to the public for the first time in 70 years, since the structure stopped functioning as a station in 1943, and lead to an observation deck fashioned from the old train platform. The new Maach Ecute Kanda Manseibashi plans to stage events and create a space to liven up the community.

Maach Ecute Kanda Manseibashi

Address 1-25-4 Kanda Suda-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo
Hours Retailers 11:00–21:00 (Sundays and holidays –20:00)
Restaurants and cafés (11:00–23:00 (Sundays and holidays –21:00) *Excluding some outlets
Access 4-min. walk from JR Akihabara Station; 6-min. walk from JR Kanda Station / Ochanomizu Station
Contact information tel:03-3257-8910
URL http://www.maach-ecute.jp/

Manseibashi station

 

Categories: history of Japan, Must see, News about Japan, Things to do, Where to eat | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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