Posts Tagged With: facebook

Japanese housewives; mostly faithful, sometimes frisky

Cheating women

Frustration within the married state is as old as the institution itself. Sexless marriage? You’ve heard this story before. Condom maker Sagami Gomu, following an in-house survey, has concluded that nearly half of all marriages in Japan are sexless.

Simultaneous developments in other spheres promise, you’d think, riotous extra-marital goings-on. More and more wives work. At work they meet people. In the warm glow of fresh encounters, home and family are another world. No need to spell it out. A stale marriage need no longer be the bondage it once was.

Then there’s the Internet. Encounter sites, social networking sites. The possibilities are endless. Even the non-working housewife has the whole erotic world at her fingertips, if she wants it.

Here’s the shock: few do want it. Josei Seven (Aug 22-29) polls 500 married women in their 40s. Question 1: “Have you ever had an extra-marital affair?” Yes, say… 10.8%. No, say 89.2%.

Question 2: “Have you ever wanted to have an affair?” Another landslide victory for the no’s – 87.9% versus 12.1%.

What’s going on? Why not? Naturally, Josei Seven poses this question too, and the replies are: “My children and home are important to me” (cited by 44.4% of respondents); “It’s unthinkable from a moral point of view” (41.9%); “I love my husband” (34.3%); “I haven’t met anyone” (22.9%) – and so on. Far down the list is a reason you might expect to find much higher up: “I’m afraid my husband would find out” (10.1%).

“Shocking” seems hardly too strong a word for what this seems to reveal about the stability of marriage in the face of restlessness, dissatisfaction and easily-available remedies.

To those who have taken a plunge into infidelity, Josei Seven asks, “Where did you meet your partner?” The workplace, as expected, is the leading nest of romantic entanglement, with 31.5% of first encounters occurring there. The Internet ranks next (24.1%) while 18.5% hook up with former boyfriends.

How long was marriage enjoyed or endured before the first affair? Here too, the replies impress upon us the surprising stability of Japanese marriage, sexless or not. Eleven years, say 63%.

“Do you feel guilty?” the magazine asks. Yes, say 68.5%; no, say 18.5%; not sure, say 13%.

“Don’t call it having an affair,” says a 50-year-old housewife and mother of a daughter in senior high school. “Call it… love.”

They met on Facebook. More accurately, they met *again* on Facebook. They had known each other in high school, where they’d been members of the same after-class club. Well, this was a pleasant surprise! Her marriage had long been happy, as marriage goes. Her husband knew music and history and talked well. He was interesting. But after 20 years who doesn’t become predictable? It happens – and when it does, you face a choice. Should you put up with it in the name of responsibility and morality? Or seize an opportunity, if it happens to come along? She made her choice, and doesn’t seem to be among the 68.5% who feel guilty about it.

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Japanese Part-Timers ‘Terrorize’ Employers with Pranks

prank

Stuffing out cigarettes in sushi, wearing pizza dough as a mask and cleaning feet in the dishwasher – these are just some of the stunts part-time workers are pulling to the delight of their Twitter followers and the chagrin of their employers.

While the part-timer pranks may not seem particular unusual to readers outside Japan, the behavior has raised eyebrows in Japan – a nation that takes dedication to work and strict discipline very seriously.Since a man posted a picture of himself lying inside a refrigerated ice cream case at his convenience store job online, local media have unveiled a new case of an employee documenting mischief on Facebook or Twitter almost daily. The trend has even spawned a new expression brimming with hyperbole: “baito tero” or “part-time job terrorism.”All the cases so far have involved workers at fast-food restaurants and convenience stores, sparking conjecture that the real cause underlying the misbehavior is the frustration of employees with low-paying, part-time jobs.

Other commentators, however, say social media is to blame.

 

Crazy Japanese part timers“For young people, the most important thing is to stand out and be noticed. For example, since social networks have become popular, cute girls have tried to attract attention knowing that some have become models after being discovered through social media. Whereas in the past, those girls would have been scouted when they were out and about walking around,” Britney Hamada, a comic book artist and television personality said on a television program last week. “That’s just escalated more and more and translated into these kinds of ‘crimes.’”

Nearly a quarter of high-school students in Japan use Twitter, while only 14% use Facebook, according to a September survey of over 4,500 students by ZKAI Co.

Whether the clowning around is down to part-time job dissatisfaction or social media overload, employers have been less than understanding, sometimes taking action that has arguably caused greater inconvenience to customers.

Nagoya-based chain restaurant Bronco Billy Co closed a Tokyo branch in early August to retrain staff after an employee uploaded a picture of himself sitting inside a refrigerator on the job.

Only a week after the closing, however, the company decided to permanently close the branch out of consideration for its responsibility to “provide a comfortable moment for the customer through delicious food, good service and a clean and fun restaurant.”

At a Lawson convenience store where an employee climbed into the refrigerator, Lawson, Inc. removed all ice cream products, dismantled the offending ice cream case and temporarily closed the store. Photos uploaded by curious neighbors show the windows shuttered and the parking lot closed off.

“All our employees and affiliate stores will work as one to regain customers trust so that this kind of thing never happens ever again,” the company said in a statement.

Categories: Japanese customs, Must see, News about Japan, Stories about Japan | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

In Japan, Young Women Rent Out Their Legs As Ad Space

A good way to get your advertisement plenty of exposure is to place it where there will be a lot of people looking.

With that in mind, Japanese advertising company Absolute Territory PR is offering a unique service that gives brands a ‘leg up’ on their competitors—by renting the legs of young Japanese girls as ad space.

Using the notion that ‘sex sells’, this clever marketing strategy was reported to be a big hit with businesses across Tokyo—especially to Japanese men.

Girls who are interested in renting out their legs will have to get their legs ‘stamped’ with an ad, after which they can go about their daily routine.

They will have to wear the ad for eight hours or more a day to get paid—and preferably dressed in miniskirts and high socks.

To prove that they are ‘advertising’ the stickers, participants must also post pictures of themselves wearing the ad on Facebook, Twitter or other social media networks.

Eichi Atsumi—a spokesperson for the ad company—said that the only guidelines for the job is that the registered person should be connected to “at least more than 20 people on some social network and that they are over 18 years old”.

According to The Daily Mail, about 1,300 girls have already “registered their legs as ad space” with the company, and the numbers are only increasing.

‘Thigh-vertisements’—yay or nay?

 

 

Categories: Japanese customs, Japanese technology, News about Japan, Stories about Japan | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Only in Japan: A restaurant with monkeys as waiters

A Japanese restaurant has changed the face of customer service by employing two monkeys to help with the table service.

The Kayabukiya tavern, a traditional ‘sake house’ north of Tokyo has employed a pair of uniformed Japanese macaque called Yat-chan and Fuku-chan to serve patrons.

Twelve-year-old Yat-chan is the crowd-pleaser as he moves quickly between tables taking customer drink orders.

Monkeys working as waiters

Monkey business: Yat-chan moves quickly between tables taking drinks to customers at the Kayabukiya tavern

The younger of the two, Fuku-chan is quick to give the diners a hot towel to help them clean their hands before they order their drinks, as is the custom in Japan.

Yat-chan and Fuku-chan, who are both certified by the local authorities to work in the tavern are well appreciate by customers, who tip them with soya beans.

‘The monkeys are actually better waiters than some really bad human ones,’ customer Takayoshi Soeno said.

Tavern owner Kaoru Otsuka, 63, originally kept the monkeys as household pets – but when the older one started aping him he realised they were capable of working in the restaurant.

Yat-chan first learned by just watching me working in the restaurant,’ he said.

‘It all started when one day I gave him a hot towel out of curiosity and he brought the towel to the customer.’

A regular of the tavern, 58-year-old Shoichi Yano, says the animals are like her children.

‘Actually, [they’re] better,’ she said. ‘My son doesn’t listen to me but Yat-chan will.’

Some clients, like retiree Miho Takikkawa, say Yat-chan appears to understand their exact orders.

We called out for more beer just then and it brought us some beer,” she said. “It’s amazing how it seems to understand human words.’

The monkeys work in shifts of up to two hours a day due to Japanese animal rights regulations.

But the owner is hoping to bring up the next generation of monkey waiters, and is already training three baby monkeys to work as waiters.

Watch the skilled monkey waiters at work

Address:

かやぶき

栃木県宇都宮市御幸本町4688

028-662-3751

Categories: Japanese customs, Must see, News about Japan, Stories about Japan, Things to do, Where to drink, Where to eat | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Facebook page

(For an English translation please scroll down)

Bezoek ook eens mijn Facebook pagina! Klik op deze link om er te komen.
Ik zou het op prijs stellen als je even op de ‘vind ik leuk’ knop zou klikken!

My Facebook page is now also available! Why don’t you take a look? Just follow this link.
I would greatly appreciate it if you pressed the ‘like’ button while you’re there!

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Introductie aanbieding (introduction offer)

(For an English translation please scroll down)

Let op:
Bij vijf aanmeldingen of meer voor dezelfde tour op dezelfde dag (alleen geldig voor een dagvullend programma) kan ik een korting geven op de pakketprijzen bovenop het extra lage introductie tarief. Voor meer informatie email mij op nicki@tokiotours.com

Voor iedereen die een aanbeveling wil schrijven, geldt tot 1 mei een kortingstarief. Mail mij voor meer informatie naar mijn voordelinge kortingstarieven.

Voor meer informatie en boekingen kun je me bereiken op nicki@tokiotours.com

English: When your group consists of 5 people or more, I can offer an additional discount on the package price (on top of the current special introduction rate). This is only applicable when you book a full day program. For more information email me on nicki@tokiotours.com

For everyone willing to write a recommendation, I offer a special introduction discount. Please email me to enquire to my special rates.

For inquiries and bookings please contact me a nicki@tokiotours.com

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